Life and Spiritual Coaching

September 28, 2009

Potential Fradulant Charges to Warch out for

Filed under: Family,Uncategorized — by Donna Ritter @ 9:36 am

I have been going over our bank statements with a fine tooth comb to see where we are spending our money (which all of you probably already do and have found charges that I didn’t make. I got either the bank or company to refund the charges. This week I had one for $143.40! I called the company and asked how they get my name to charge. She said whenever you get a magazine subscription on line or lots of other on-line activities they automatically charge you this *and* it is a revolving charge not a one time charge. They happily are refunding me but knowing that happens will give me some extra time each week to check the accounts.

One time I caught one and called them and they said they wouldn’t take it off because I was over the 30 day limit! I had them transfer me 5 times until I got someone high enough to refund my money. I’m sure this is some kind of fraud but I’m not sure who to report it to. If any of you do, please tell me.

The other place where I have had fraudulent charges show up is on my phone bill, AT&T won’t do anything about it but give you the number. I asked to have nu number blocked and they said they couldn’t. I am very close to dropping AT&T but we have 2 year contracts on 4 cell phones and I don’t want to be charged for that if I switch over.

Warn your friends. Help us stop this behavior!

May 2, 2009

Do You Know what it means to miss New Orleans

Filed under: Family,Fun — by Donna Ritter @ 12:08 pm
Tags:
 
you’ve never heard of a dry county.

you don’t know what a county is.

when you hear gambling is illegal in some other states and are surprised.

you know the 12 Yats of Christmas by heart.

you know what Schwegman’s is.

when you know what “LAGNIAPPE” and “LAISSEZ LE BON TEMPS ROULER” mean.

when you go away for college, and when you tell people where you’re from they automatically know you can drink more than everyone at the school put together

u tried “cajun” food somewhere else and u thought it tasted like shit

You reinforce your attic to store Mardi Gras beads.

Your sunglasses fog up when you step outside.

When you give directions you use “lakeside and riverside” not north & south.

Your ancestors are buried above the ground.

You get on a green streetcar to go to the park and a red one to the French Quarter.

You take a bite of five-alarm chili and reach for the Tabasco.

You don’t learn until high school that Mardi Gras is not a national
holiday.

You push little old ladies out of the way to catch Mardi Gras beads.

Little old ladies push YOU out of the way to catch Mardi Gras beads.

You leave a parade with footprints on your hands.

You believe that purple, green, and gold look good together.

Your last name isn’t pronounced the way it’s spelled.

you get aggrevated when 1. people think mardi gras takes place in the french quarter and 2. that people think that no matter what time of the year it is if they go to the french quarter they will get a boob shot!

when you get pissed at people who pronounce it nawlins, norlens, or new or leans.

You know what a nutria is but you still pick it to represent your baseball team.

No matter where else you go in the world, you are always disappointed in the food.

Your town is low on the education chart, high on the obesity chart and you don’t care because you’re No. 1 on the party chart.

Your house payment is less than your utility bill.

You don’t show your “pretties” during Mardi Gras.

You know that Tchoupitoulas is a street and not a disease.

Your grandparents are called “Maw-Maw” and “Paw-Paw.”

Your Santa Claus rides an alligator and your favorite Saint is a football player.

You cringe every time you hear an actor with a Southern or Cajun accent in a “New Orleans-based” movie or TV show.

You have to reset your clocks after every thunderstorm.

You’re walking in the French Quarter with a plastic cup of beer.

When it starts to rain, you cover your beer instead of your head.

You eat dinner out and spend the entire meal talking about all the other good places you’ve eaten.

You actually get these jokes and pass them on to other friends from Louisiana.

you know what is meant by ‘K&B purple

You know what it means for food to come ‘dressed’…

you ‘ax’ for things…

you see a van taxi with spinners

you know your from new orleans if you recognize at least one person in a parade

You save newspapers, not for recycling but for tablecloths at crawfishboils

when you travel abroad you always remember to pack 2 things: bottle of tabasco and a salt shaker of tony’s in your purse

Drive-thru daquiris — it’s not drinking and driving until you put the straw in.

You drive east to get to the West Bank.

You stand on the neutral ground at parades and have no idea what a ‘median’ is.

You get annoyed when you wear a Perlis shirt and people ask you if you work at Red Lobster.

You know how to pronounce Mignon Faget.

pulling a baby out of a cake is completely normal.

you know McKenzie is both a football player and a landmark

you made one bad turn and you end up on the twin span at least once.

you know what the twin span is.

you shop at Lakeside.

you listen to people represent their ward on Q93.

you know that the Riverwalk is for tourists.

sock hops were cool in middle school (and not the 70s) AND you think its stupid when people ask you if you actually took your socks off.

someone asks you for starbucks and you give them CCs or PJs

you have waited in the ridiculously long line for Camellia Grill during lunch at least once.

The only Bush you respect is a Black man.

You refuse to believe that there is such a thing as the “Utah Jazz”.

There is a color called “Bur-GUN-dee”.

The concept of a basement never crossed your mind.

You get your car’s suspension repaired at least twice a year.

You know at least two best places for sno-balls.

You’ve seen roaches bigger than rats.

You’ve seen rats bigger than cats.

the roof of your house was at sea level, and your stuff was at the “bottom of the sea”

WHEN YOU DONT REFER ”MARDI GRAS” AS THE CARNIVAL…WHO SAYS THAT???

If someone in a Lowe’s store offers you assistance and they don’t work there, you may live in Louisiana

If you’ve worn shorts and a parka at the same time, you may live in Louisiana

If you’ve had a lengthy telephone conversation with someone who dialed a wrong number, you may live in Louisiana.

If “Vacation” means going to Dallas for the weekend,
you may live in Louisiana.

If you measure distance in hours, you may live in Louisiana .

If you know several people who have hit a deer more than once, you may live in Louisiana.

If you install security lights on your house and garage, but leave both unlocked, you may live in Louisiana.

If you carry jumper cables in your car and your wife knows how to use them , you may live in Louisiana.

If the speed limit on the highway is 55 mph — you’re going 80 and everybody is passing you, you may live in Louisiana

You know that there is one “Original Lee’s Hamburgers” even though they all say they are the one.

If there’s a major hurricane headed straight for you and all you’re worried about is that they changed the time of the LSU game.

March 18, 2009

Friends vs Southern Friends!

Filed under: Family,Fun,Life — by Donna Ritter @ 1:43 pm

FRIENDS: Never ask for food.

SOUTHERN FRIENDS: Always bring the food.

FRIENDS: Will say ‘hello’.

SOUTHERN FRIENDS: Will give you a big hug and a kiss.

FRIENDS: Call your parents Mr. and Mrs.

SOUTHERN FRIENDS: Call your parents Mom and Dad

FRIENDS: Have never seen you cry.

SOUTHERN FRIENDS: Cry with you.

FRIENDS: Will eat at your dinner table and leave.

SOUTHERN FRIENDS: Will spend hours there, talking, laughing, and just being together.

FRIENDS: Know a few things about you.

SOUTHERN FRIENDS: Could write a book with direct quotes from you.

FRIENDS: Will leave you behind if that’s what the crowd is doing.

SOUTHERN FRIENDS: Will kick the whole crowds’ back-ends that left you.

FRIENDS: Would knock on your door.

SOUTHERN FRIENDS: Walk right in and say, ‘I’m home!’

FRIENDS: will visit you in jail

SOUTHERN FRIENDS: will spend the night in jail with you   

FRIENDS: will visit you in the hospital when you’re sick

SOUTHERN FRIENDS: will cut your grass and clean your house then come spend the night with you in the hospital and cook for you when you come home

FRIENDS: have you on speed dial

SOUTHERN FRIENDS: have your number memorized

FRIENDS: Are for a while.

SOUTHERN FRIENDS: Are for life.

FRIENDS: Might ignore this.

SOUTHERN FRIENDS: Will forward this to all their Southern Friends

Which one are you?

 

December 27, 2008

Good friends are worth their weight in gold

Filed under: Christian,Family,Life Balance — by Donna Ritter @ 9:30 am
Tags: , ,

I had always dreamed of walking down the aisle at graduation with my Dad in his Harvard robes. When I was a senior in college, He was coming back from giving a paper and had a heart attack on the airplane. Even though they emergency landed the plane in Atlanta, he died. That night I had double dated with my sister to see a “Yes” concert, but went home earlier than she did since I had an 8:00 am Calculus class.

I was a senior in college when my Mom called me up (after a very late night at a YES concert) and asked me to come over since my Dad was “sick”. I told her I needed to sleep and would be there after my class in the morning. My parents were divorced by then, so I thought it was a bit weird, but went back to sleep. Then she called back and told me I was dead. I rushed to her house at 3 in the morning n tears. My Dad was my best friend. My Mom wanted me to find my sister but I had no idea where she was and there were no cell phones back then. She gave me a stiff drink (which was the last thing I needed – but I took it anyway). We waited for my sister Barby to show up and when she did, we both broke down in tears again. My Mom asked me to go to my Dad’s apartment to look for a will (he was only 45) and she didn’t feel comfortable doing it. I was a basket case. Luckily my roommate was there to drive me.

Seeing my Dad’s most personal things was horrible to me. I found what I could and brought it back to my Mom.

I stayed there, but went to school because at the beginning of the semester, my professor had said there would be no exceptions to missing exams. I must have looked a mess, because one of my friends came up as I was waiting and said”what happened to you, did someone die or something”? When he heard my story, he walked into the classroom and explained my situation to the professor and she was so nice, and told me of course I could make it up. Maybe it helped that my Dad was the Dean of the Graduate School – but he led me out of school to the next door college bar. Now this was about 8:30 am. My best friend said “Let’s have a few beers and celebrate his life”. We did and we laughed and cried at the same time. One old drunk came over and asked us what was going on. When we told him, he cried too! We all started laughing which sounds weird, but it was what I needed most.

It was then that I found out who your real friends are. Some that I thought were my friends looked the other way when I was coming. Some sat with me and let me talk, cry and cried with me. It was like my Dad’s death was contagious and some of my so called friends didn’t want to catch the “germ”.  That’s when I learned the value of true friends. They are with you through the good and bad, the ugly, the horrible and the tragedy. Some of those people I can call today (and I’m 53) and it’s like we never stopped talking.

Then the next shoe hit the floor. My Mom wanted me to decide where my Dad should be buried! His Dad was on vacation, but I refused to make any decisions until I could talk to my Grandfather. No parent should survive their children. I had never had death touch me, and I couldn’t handle it. I was floored that my Mom couldn’t see that.

We ended up sending the police after my grandfather. Thank God he took care of everything. We all flew up to Massachusetts were my first Grandmother was buried. My Dad was cremated and buried next to her. My Grandfather sent me the pictures he developed that my Dad had taken on that trip; they were of the same place where he was buried. It was fall, so I’m sure he was taking pictures of the changing leaves – but is was still creepy. My sister and I didn’t have much money, but we went to a florist and bought roses to lie on his grave.

When we got home, the money he had was to be left to any minor children (of which I was not) but there was an insurance policy with me as the beneficiary. I felt said because he had always wanted a boat. I think you should always make sure you experience your dreams.

My Mom said she and Barby would take me to court to get that money – so I gave it to them. Not worth fighting for. I almost quit college at the suggestion of my Mom, but my Dad’s professor friends rallied around me and got me through it (thank goodness for those wonderful men).

I gave up the idea of graduate school and got a job in the computer industry where I have been for 30 years. My Mom and Scott moved up to New York before I graduated and no one I was related to came to the ceremony. Not even my sister.

My husband and I have an iron clad will so hopefully none of this business will happen. I grew up very fast during those years and still hear my Dad in my prayers. I made peace with my Mom before she died (at 72) and I am very glad I did. Family is what is most important and should never be taken for granted. Nor should goof friends – they are worth gold and they endure much longer than teenage crushes or small arguments. Nurture them with love and they will serve you for your whole life.

You never know when your time will be up so always tell your loved ones how much you love and appreciate them. Never go to bed with any anger in your heart. I have a sign over our bed that says “Never forget to kiss me Goodnight” so my husband and I remember how important it is. Forgive no matter what and live so you have no regrets on your deathbed. Older people will tell you that the only thing they worry about are regrets from a missed time to tell someone they loved them or a missed time to spend more time with their kids. Don’t let that happen to you. Life goes by in a blink! Live, Laugh and Love everyone! You never know when the last day will come – so no regrets!

 

 

 

November 16, 2008

Let Me Be Known By The Company I keep – a poem by Beth Moore

Filed under: Bible,Family — by Donna Ritter @ 6:03 pm
Tags:

I just finished a bible study by Beth Moore called “Living Beyond Yourself”. This is the poem at the end and I’d like to share it to you. It has spoken to me.

THE COMPANY I KEEP

 

Let me be known by the company I keep

By the One who determines each day that I greet

From the moment I wake til He rocks me to sleep

Let me be known by the company I keep!

Let me be known by the company I keep

When the valleys are low and the mountains are steep

By the One who holds fast when swift waters are deep

Let me be known by the company I keep!

Let me be known by the company I keep

By the One who implores me to sit at His feet

And quickens my soul to discern what is deep

Let me be known by the company I keep!

Let me be known by the company I keep

Eclipsed by your presence that I may decrease

Til all You have chosen this traveler to meet

No longer see me but the Company I keep.

—Beth

 

But the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness, and self-control. Against such things there is no law (Gal. 5:22-23).

 

 

November 15, 2008

Moving Out for the First Time – Advice

Filed under: Family,Life Coaching — by Donna Ritter @ 3:20 pm
Tags:

 

·        Always pay yourself first. Put as much money into savings as you can and leave it there until you have enough to live on for 6 months or so. You will never be sorry. Start your retirement fund early and don’t touch it. If you go to work for a company that matches your contributions, take advantage of it.

·        Be wary of credit cards. They are too easy to get and too hard to pay off. If you have to buy it on credit, you probably can’t afford it anyway and most likely don’t need it. If you use credit cards regularly, you will pay many times for the same item. Save buying on credit for two major purchases, a car and a house.

·        Invest your money in things that you understand. If you don’t understand it, then either educate yourself or find something you do understand. This understanding will help you decide when to invest, when to hold and when to sell.

·        Find a job doing something that you love to do. You spend most of your life at work; it helps to enjoy what you are doing. This may seem like a strange to say that while making a lot of money is great, doing something that you enjoy and are good at will bring you more satisfaction in the long run so try to find a balance between being a starving artist and overstressed CEO.

·        Keep an emergency savings account.  In a perfect world, this would be enough to support you for 6 months but it can be as little as $1000.  The emergency funds purpose is to pay for emergencies.  I know you are saying “duh, Mom” but you have to understand that emergencies happen all the time. It is for things like the car broke down and I can’t get to work without it.

·        Setting down. When you find that special person, make sure that they are someone who will support and respect you.  Hopefully, you will find someone with similar goals to yours, both financial and life goals.  I have found that while love is grand if the support, respect and common goals aren’t there, love loses out at worst and at best your life will be a struggle. I was so lucky to meet your Dad. We were best friends for a long time before we dated and it made all the difference in the world. When hard times come, and they will, you need your best friend to support you and hold you when you think you can’t go on.

·        Your career. Whatever you do, do it with all your heart.  You are smart enough to do anything you want to, you just have to make up your mind that you are going to do it.  Don’t let anyone beat you down.  Don’t settle for second best, you deserve the best of the best.

 

 

 

 

October 26, 2008

Tips on living a Balanced Life

Filed under: Family,Life Balance,Life Coaching — by Donna Ritter @ 12:11 pm
Tags: , , ,

Everything we do comes with a cost. One thing I do is to spend a good part of my time learning new things. I think that time is well spent and I would advise anyone to put learning in your life balance set. The things I have in my life balance are:

·    Spirituality: I spend lots of time studying books about God, reading the bible and participating in bible studies. It keeps me grounded and happy.

·    Family: I spend as much time as possible with my family. My kids are in college, so that is hard. I always make a big deal on holidays and take 2 weeks off during Christmas – my favorite holiday.

·    Learning: I read constantly, take courses, practice new things. I don’t think I could ever give this up.

·    Work: when I am working I put my full attention to it and do it well.

·    Exercise/health: I spend time in the gym and love to hike on the weekends if I can.

·    Managing the house: believe me – this can be a full time job, but I keep up on it and parcel out work to my husband to lighten my load. I also have a cleaning lady come in once a week. I’ve had her for 15 years and she is part of the family. I call her my angel.

·    Fun – this can be a date with my husband, doing some of my hobbies (I like taking pictures and writing), or curling up with a romantic novel to relax. It can also be hiking or doing something else outside. I love nature.

The important thing is for you to spend time defining what you like to do in your job; it takes so much of your time. Never forget the other things in your life that give you balance. When I am at work, I make sure to take a few minutes each hour or so to do a 5 minute meditation to calm myself down and be the best I can be at work. I always clean off my desk at the end of the day and write down the tasks I need to do the next day. These change of course, but it gives me something to start with when I arrive. I do my best not to think about work at home so I can concentrate on my other priorities. If possible, I exercise at lunch. If not, I walk at lunch. You can walk almost anywhere you are and it costs nothing. Being out in the sun clears my mind and energizes me for the afternoon.

I schedule time for each of my priorities listed above and try to make sure they are always taken care of. If something happens where I miss one, I get out of sync and have to get back to the things that balance my life.

Remember – you are the only one that will truly take care of you. Make your list of priorities and schedule them in your day timer each week so that you don’t over commit yourself. That will help you to live a truly balanced life.

 

Peace be with you and take good care of yourself!

 

Donna

October 7, 2008

Living with Children over 18 – what are the rules?

Filed under: Family,Life Balance — by Donna Ritter @ 3:56 pm
Tags: , , ,

 

Our family is going through growing pains of sorts. Both of my children are over 18 years old and are biological having lived with us all of their lives.

I believe there are certain things that family members always should have and always should do. That is love each other unconditionally, respect each other, show each other courtesy and be honest with each other. They should also ask for forgiveness when necessary. The problem is our kids have reached young adult hood which has other expectations of instant freedom that sometimes can conflict while still being dependent on their parents if we aren’t careful.

What are the rules that should still exist? This is my position:

·         Love will never die and should rule any of our relationships. We should always talk to each other with respect and share what parts of our lives we want to.

·         We all have cell phones and can be reached at anytime, so we should at least make a pact to return calls from each other as soon as possible. Cell phones are a new concept for my husband and I – but one which my kids have lived with from the start.

·         We should respect and trust each other. This means we should talk to each other with kindness and honesty. Yes, the kids are old enough to live on their own, but since they are still living with the parents, I expect them to do things with us sometimes and let us know where they are at other times.

·         We need to treat each other with common courtesy. If you were staying at a friend’s house, and used their kitchen to make yourself food, you would clean it up. If you needed to use their washer or dryer, you would make sure you took care of the clothes they had in there already and get your clothes out of their dryer and fold them and put them away in your room. We all need to follow these rules.

·         If you are going to be late coming home, you should call and let the others know so they won’t worry.

 

Does anyone have any similar experiences or comments?

July 28, 2008

The First Time Death Knocks on your Door

Filed under: Family — by Donna Ritter @ 6:05 pm
Tags:

I had always dreamed of walking down the aisle at graduation with my Dad in his Harvard robes. When I was a senior in college, He was coming back from giving a paper and had a heart attack on the airplane. Even though they emergency landed the plane in Atlanta, he died. That night I had double dated with my sister to see a “Yes” concert, but went home earlier than she did since I had an 8:00 am Calculus class.

My Mom called me up and asked me to come over since my Dad was “sick”. I told her I needed to sleep and would be there after my class in the morning. My parents were divorced by then, so I thought it was a bit weird, but went back to sleep. Then she called back and told me I was dead. I rushed to her house at 3 in the morning n tears. My Dad was my best friend. My Mom wanted me to find my sister but I had no idea where she was and there were no cell phones back then. She gave me a stiff drink (which was the last thing I needed – but I took it anyway). We waited for Barby to show up and both broke down in tears again. My Mom asked me to go to my Dad’s apartment to look for a will (he was only 45) and she didn’t feel comfortable doing it. I was a basket case. Luckily my roommate was there to drive me.

Seeing my Dad’s most personal things was horrible to me. I found what I could and brought it back to my Mom.

I stayed there, but went to school because at the beginning of the semester, my professor had said there would be no exceptions to missing exams. I must have looked a mess, because one of my friends came up as I was waiting and said ”what happened to you, did someone die or something”? When he heard my story, he walked into the classroom and explained my situation to the professor and she was so nice, and told me of course I could make it up. Maybe it helped that my Dad was the Dean of the Graduate School – but he led me out of school to the next door college bar. Now this was about 8:30 am. My best friend said “Let’s have a few beers and celebrate his life”. We did and we laughed and cried at the same time. One old drunk came over and asked us what was going on. When we told him, he cried too! We all started laughing which sounds weird, but it was what I needed most.

It was then that I found out who your real friends are. Some that I thought were my friends looked the other way when I was coming. Some sat with me and let me talk, cry and cried with me. It was like my Dad’s death was contagious and some of my so called friends didn’t want to catch the “germ”.

Then the next shoe hit the floor. My Mom wanted me to decide where my Dad should be buried! His Dad was on vacation, but I refused to make any decisions until I could talk to my Grandfather. No parent should survive their children. I had never had death touch me, and I couldn’t handle it. I was floored that my Mom couldn’t see that.

We ended up sending the police after my grandfather. Thank God he took care of everything. We all flew up to Massachusetts were my first Grandmother was buried. My Dad was cremated and buried next to her. My Grandfather sent me the pictures he developed that my Dad had taken on that trip; they were of the same place where he was buried. It was fall, so I’m sure he was taking pictures of the changing leaves – but is was still creepy. My sister and I didn’t have much money, but we went to a florist and bought roses to lie on his grave.

When we got home, the money he had was to be left to any minor children (of which I was not) but there was an insurance policy with me as the beneficiary. I felt said because he had always wanted a boat. I think you should always make sure you experience your dreams.

My Mom said she and Barby would take me to court to get that money – so I gave it to them. Not worth fighting for. I almost quit college at the suggestion of my Mom, but my Dad’s professor friends rallied around me and got me through it (think goodness for those wonderful men).

I gave up the idea of graduate school and got a job in the computer industry where I have been for 30 years. My Mom and Scott moved up to New York before I graduated and no one I was related to came to the ceremony. Not even my sister.

My husband and I have an iron clad will so hopefully none of this business will happen. I grew up very fast during those years and still hear my Dad in my prayers. I made peace with my Mom before she died (at 72) and I am very glad I did. Family is what is most important and should never be taken for granted.

You never know when your time will be up so always tell your loved ones how much you love and appreciate them. Never go to bed with any anger in your heart. Forgive no matter what and live so you have no regrets on your deathbed. Live, Laugh and Love everyone! You never know when the last day will come – so no regrets!

July 26, 2008

Youthful Summers

Filed under: Family — by Donna Ritter @ 12:13 pm
Tags:

Every summer my family would travel to New England where my extended family lived. We lived in New Orleans. My Mom had 3 sisters (of which she was the youngest) and 2 brothers. One is only 5 years older than me and my Grandmother and my oldest Aunt were pregnant at the same time!

 

Since my Dad was a professor, he could not get away for a month, so my Mother and us kids went first and then my father joined us for the last 2 weeks. My Mom’s family was big and lived in New York and Connecticut. My Dad was an only child and lived in Massachusetts. His parents doted on us since we were the only of their grandchildren. They had a boat that they named Daba (D for the first letter of my name, A for the last letter of my name) and a dingy named Scotty for my brother who was 13 years younger than I was. We would take the boat out and catch fresh lobsters in traps and boil them on the boat.

 

After my brother was born we moved to a larger house. In high school my best friend had a baby when she was 15 and we would walk the babies around. I pretended Scotty was mine and spent my allowance buying him cute clothes. He was actually born in California when my Dad was on sabbatical.

 

The only other vacations we took were to Destin Beach in Alabama and the panhandle of Florida – both of which had beautiful white sandy beaches.

 

In Hurricane Betsy, my parents house was flooded with 4 feet of water and we couldn’t live there for some time. Luckily, the church helped my parents rebuild.

 

One thing my Dad (the professor) was always strict about was the classes I took. I had to have 4 years each of Math, English, Social Studies and Science. This served me very well once I got to college. My parents had me tested and apparently I had a higher IQ than my Dad (which he never mentioned) so they tried to get me to go to a special college prep high school, but I wouldn’t hear of it. I would miss al my friends!

 

I grew up in the baby boomer years and was a big hippy. I dabbled in drugs, but was such a tight wad that I never bought my own things. To my Dad’s credit, he sat me down and explained that he didn’t necessarily think drugs were bad, but dealers cut them with rat poison to get a quick high. He said he knew about these things since he was on campus and helped college kids that had problems. He just wanted me to be careful.

That was the great thing about my Dad. He never yelled at me, but I knew if I disappointed him be his look and I avoided that at all cost. I made great grades and was always respectful to my parents. I would never want to be a teenager again!

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